Logo
Sound journalism, grounded in facts and Biblical truth | Donate

Poets' Corners adds Lewis memorial on anniversary of his death


C.S. Lewis Associated Press/Photo by John Chillingworth/Harper Collins

Poets' Corners adds Lewis memorial on anniversary of his death

Fifty years ago today C.S. Lewis died, becoming, by his own description, “more human than [he] ever succeeded in being on earth.” Westminster Abbey in London today remembered Lewis by adding a memorial to him in Poets' Corner, the burial place of Geoffrey Chaucer, Charles Dickens, and numerous other famous British writers.

News of Lewis’ memorial was overshadowed by the 50th anniversary of the death of President John F. Kennedy, who was assassinated that same day. Many Christians might argue Lewis’ work was even more influential than the late president’s.

The memorial stone in Poets' Corner lies in tribute to Lewis’ life, faith, and work, bearing one of the author’s most quotable lines: “I believe in Christianity as I believe the sun has risen. Not only because I can see it but because by it I can see everything else.”

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. Rowan Williams, a great fan of Lewis, gave the main address at the ceremony to unveil the stone before 1,000 guests.

Born in 1898, Lewis is best known for his imaginative and allegorically Christian series The Chronicles of Narnia, which has sold more than 100 million copies worldwide.

Other well-known works such as The Screwtape Letters and Mere Christianity continue to influence hearts for the Christian gospel, as pastors and parishioners alike cannot help but think upon and share with the world Lewis’ unique and insightful writings on God and His creation.


Whitney Williams

Whitney works on WORLD's development team and has spent more than a decade with the organization in various roles. She earned a journalism degree from Baylor University and resides in Texas with her husband and three sons.

COMMENT BELOW

Please wait while we load the latest comments...

Comments

Please register, subscribe, or login to comment on this article.