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Yemeni rebels agree to extend truce


Yemenis inspects a site of Saudi-led airstrikes targeting two houses in Sanaa, Yemen, on March 26. Associated Press/Photo by Hani Mohammed, file

Yemeni rebels agree to extend truce

Houthi militants who have been fighting government-aligned forces in Yemen for eight years agreed Thursday to pause the conflict for an additional two months. The United Nations–brokered truce, originally put in place in early April, is meant to bring relief to civilians in a conflict that has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis. Since the country’s civil war broke out in 2014, 233,00 people have died, and 5 million are at risk of famine. The truce allows vital fuel ships to dock at a rebel-held port and allows some commercial flights out of the capital, Sanaa. However, the Houthis would not open up main roads in the key city of Taiz that have been blockaded since 2015 and prompted local protests.

Does the United States have a position on the war? The United States has recognized the Yemeni government and in the past given logistical support to Saudi Arabia, which is fighting the Iranian-aligned Houthis. President Joe Biden broke off direct U.S. support for the Saudi operation, but his administration continues to sell weapons to Saudi Arabia and conducts anti-terrorism activities in Yemen. Thursday’s truce extension, which the Biden administration supported, came ahead of the U.S. president’s planned visit to Saudi Arabia later this month.

Dig deeper: Read Mary Muncy’s Sift report about Saudi-led airstrikes that killed dozens of people in rebel-held areas in January.


Daniel James Devine

Daniel is editor of WORLD Magazine. He is a World Journalism Institute graduate and a former science and technology reporter. Daniel resides in Indiana.

@DanJamDevine


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