Logo
Sound journalism, grounded in facts and Biblical truth | Donate

Taliban celebrates U.S. departure


Taliban fighters arrive inside the Hamid Karzai International Airport after the U.S. military's withdrawal, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday. Associated Press/Photo by Khwaja Tawfiq Sediqi

Taliban celebrates U.S. departure

Taliban insurgents mounted Humvees and armored SUVs and waved their white flags during a Wednesday victory parade in the southern city of Kandahar. The vehicles and other hardware had belonged to U.S. and Afghan forces before the final American troops left Afghanistan on Monday. In one video posted online, the militants held US-made weapons while examining a parked CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter.

Can they use the equipment? Pentagon press secretary John Kirby told CNN on Tuesday that the American military made all the ground vehicles and aircraft unusable before departing. Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said it’s unclear how the Taliban’s future might play out, but he said the United States might coordinate with the group to stage military strikes against the Islamic State and other militant groups. On Wednesday, three California school districts confirmed more than 30 California children, including U.S. citizens, are still stuck in Afghanistan. Officials said they traveled to visit relatives weeks before the Taliban seized power.

Dig deeper: Read Mindy Belz’s WORLD report on the closing door for Afghans to escape.


Onize Ohikere

Onize is WORLD’s Africa reporter. She is a World Journalism Institute graduate and earned a journalism degree from Minnesota State University–Moorhead. Onize resides in Abuja, Nigeria.

@onize_ohiks

COMMENT BELOW

Please wait while we load the latest comments...

Comments

Please register or subscribe to comment on this article.


OldMike

I’m sure this statement will raise the ire of many, but…

The Taliban is now the legitimate government of Afghanistan. If the Afghan people truly wanted democracy, equal rights for women, religious freedom, etc., they would stand up to the Taliban. The government we were propping up, Karzai and his ilk, were evidently corrupt and cynical thieves. Some, if not all, apparently stashed much of the US taxpayer dollars intended for building a secure Afghan democracy in their secret Swiss or Bahamian bank accounts. Good riddance to them.

The way we ended our involvement in Afghanistan was shoddy and shameful, but the end itself was long overdue. 19 years ago would have been a far better time to bow out.

Now we must make our accommodations with the new regime in Afghanistan. I’m sure the Biden/Pelosi/Schumer administration is capable of doing that, although less honorably and transparent than we would prefer.

Now let’s see our government start working on problems here at home. There are enough of those to keep them busy.

Salty1OldMike

In my view 4 to 5 thousand troops was small potatoes to keep the government going. In South Korea we still have troops stationed there. I would agree that our State Department clearly had their head in the sand as well as the military thinking both the Afghanistan government and military would stand. The State Department was flying the gay flag in Afghanistan just before the fall. They were clearly focusing on the wrong things.