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CDC renews some mask guidelines


Children wearing masks arrive at school in fall 2020. Associated Press/Photo by Chris Granger/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate (file)

CDC renews some mask guidelines

Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), pushed for “universal masking” at a Tuesday news conference. Given rising infections from the delta variant, she recommended all students, teachers, and staff in K-12 schools wear masks even if they have received the COVID-19 vaccine. Walensky also told vaccinated people to resume masking indoors in “high” and “substantial” community transmission regions. The CDC classifies every county in Florida and Arkansas as a high-risk area.

Why the return to masking? Walensky said vaccines are not as effective against the delta variant, which accounts for over 80 percent of U.S. cases. She reported the possibility that vaccinated people could spread the delta variant but confirmed that most transmissions and nearly all hospitalizations occur in the unvaccinated population. The United States has about 57,000 new COVID-19 cases per day and 24,000 hospitalizations. The country averages fewer than 250 deaths per day.

Dig deeper: Read Dr. Charles Horton’s take on vaccines and virus mutations.


Carolina Lumetta

Carolina is a reporter for WORLD Digital. She is a World Journalism Institute and Wheaton College graduate. She resides in Harrisburg, Pa.

@CarolinaLumetta

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not silent

The site won't let me reply, but this is in response to CaptTee: Respectfully, SOME of the quote you provided may be based on some degree of speculation (i.e., "vaccinated people could spread the delta variant.") However, for those who are willing to look at the data, there is scientific evidence that "most transmissions and nearly all hospitalizations occur in the unvaccinated population." In medicine, it's very hard to say things are AWAYS one way or another (i.e., our bodies are extremely complicated and there is a huge variety between individuals); so they have to go by statistics. That's why doctors may have to revise the guidance they give if there's new evidence.

Since you claim Walnesky is "setting policy based on speculation," may I ask what you are using to set your own personal policy and inform your comment? What scientific fact are you using that the chief scientists and doctors in our country don't have?

CaptTee

"Walensky said vaccines are not as effective against the delta variant, which accounts for over 80 percent of U.S. cases. She reported the possibility that vaccinated people could spread the delta variant but confirmed that most transmissions and nearly all hospitalizations occur in the unvaccinated population. "

That sounds like setting policy based on speculation, not scientific fact.

There is a possibility that I could win a lottery because someone else bought me ticket too! I am not going to live my life based on that speculation either.

Let's deal in proven facts not speculation!

Nanamiro

If you look at other dates in the last year where we were having the same number of new cases per week, you'll notice there were 3-4x as many deaths as there are today. That is great news and shows that these variants are either less deadly or high-risk people are not catching Covid as like they were.